S+ Stimulant: GLENN GOULD

 

“I believe that the justification of art is the internal combustion it ignites in the hearts of men and not its shallow, externalized, public manifestations. The purpose of art is not the release of a momentary ejection of adrenalin but is, rather, the gradual, lifelong construction of a state of wonder and serenity.” -Glenn Gould

EMBRACE YOUR ECCENTRICITIES

The most extraordinary creative geniuses were those who had the courage to be entirely themselves. Non conformists, who bent the rules in order to better express their singular creativity. Be brave. Let your freak flag fly high. Let your creativity flow in your very own specific way; do what it takes to let your singular voice be heard.

*Glenn Gould was a Canadian pianist who became one of the best-known and most celebrated classical pianists of the 20th century. Gould is widely known for his unusual habits. He usually hummed while he played the piano. Gould claimed that his singing was subconscious and increased proportionately with the inability of the piano in question to realize the music as he intended. Gould was renowned for his peculiar body movements while playing and for his insistence on absolute control over every aspect of his playing environment. The piano had to be set at a certain height and would be raised on wooden blocks if necessary. A small rug would sometimes be required for his feet underneath the piano. He had to sit fourteen inches above the floor and would play concerts only while sitting on the old chair his father had made. He continued to use this chair even when the seat was completely worn through.

Gould was averse to cold, and wore heavy clothing (including gloves), even in warm places. He was once arrested, presumably mistaken for a vagrant, while sitting on a park bench in Sarasota, Florida, dressed in his standard all-climate attire of coat(s), warm hat, and mittens. He also disliked social functions. He hated being touched, and in later life he limited personal contact, relying on the telephone and letters for communication.

George Szell, who led Gould in 1957 with the Cleveland Orchestra, remarked to his assistant, “That nut’s a genius.”

Watch Glenn Gould play some Bach:


* source: Wikipedia.

Published: September 26th, 2011